Search
Topics
  Create an account Home  ·  Information  ·  Your Account  ·  Contact Us  ·  Classifieds  
Ads

EquestrianCupid.com - the best horse-lover dating site!


Select Area
Driving Directions
NOAA Weather
Traffic Information

Free Classifieds 

Menu
· Home
· Archived_Stories
· Encyclopedia
· FAQ
· Information
· Search
· Top 30
· Web_Links

Get Map
MapQuest
Address/Intersection:
City:
State:ZIP Code:

Google Search
Google



Headlines

Singles & Dating
[ Singles & Dating ]

·Horsewanted.com Personals
·AllDatingNetwork.com
·Uberdate.com
·EquestrianCupid.com
·EquestrianSingles.com

Who's Online
There are currently, 46 guest(s) and 0 member(s) that are online.

You are Anonymous user. You can register for free by clicking here


U.S.A.: Vaccination Recommendations
Posted on Saturday, December 10 @ 17:24:28 CST by iljiana

Horse Tips and Suggestions Before we realize it, we will be asking our veterinarian about vaccinating our horses for the coming year. Here are some concise, easy to understand guidelines from the American Association of Equine Practitioners. It is important to remember that the best person to customize a vaccination program for your horse--is your local equine practitioner. He or she will be familiar with your management practices, nutritional program and disease threats in your area. Look these over and if you have questions, contact your local equine practitioner.

Vaccination Guidelines from the American Association of Equine Practitioners
This is a suggested vaccination schedule, specific recommendations will vary according to region, type of horse, disease threats and other factors. The equine veterinarian in your area is best qualified to offer specific programs for vaccinating your horses. Remember that vaccination is just one tool in the fight to prevent disease in your horses. Good nutrition and management practices also play an important role in this fight. If you have questions about vaccinating your horses, contact your equine veterinarian.

West Nile Virus | Tetanus toxoid | Encephalomyelitis (EEE, WEE, VEE) | Influenza (Flu) |
Rhinopneumonitis (Rhino) EHV-1 and EHV-4 | Strangles | Rabies | Potomac Horse Fever |
Botulism | Equine Viral Arteritis (EVA) | Rotavirus A



Disease
West Nile Virus
Tetanus toxoid
Foals and Weanlings
First dose: 3 to 4 months From nonvaccinated mare: First dose: 3 to 4 months; Second dose: 4 to 5 months; From nonvaccinated mare: First dose: 6 months; Second dose: 7 months; Third dose: 8 to 9 months

Yearlings
Annual booster, prior to expected risk. Vacinate semi-annually or more frequently (every 4 months) depending on risk Annual
Performance Horses
Annual booster, prior to expected risk. Vacinate semi-annually or more frequently (every 4 months) depending on risk Annual
Pleasure
Horses
Annual booster, prior to expected risk. Vacinate semi-annually or more frequently (every 4 months) depending on risk

Annual
Broodmares

Annual, 4 to 6 weeks before due date

Annual, 4 to 6 weeks before due date

Comments

Annual booster is after primary series. In endemic areas, booster as required or warranted due to local conditions conducive to disease risk. Vaccinate semi-annually or more frequently (every 4 months) depending on risk. Booster at time of penetrating injury or surgery if last dose not administered within 6 months




Disease
Encephalomyelitis
(EEE, WEE, VEE)
Influenza (Flu)
Foals and Weanlings EEE: (in high-risk areas) First dose: 3 to 4 months Second dose: 4 to 5 months Third dose: 5 to 6 months WEE, EEE and VEE (in low risk areas)
From nonvaccinated mare: First does: 3 to 4 months Second dose: 4 to 5 months Third dose: 5 to 6 months From vaccinated mare: First dose: 6 months Second dose: 7 months Third dose: 8 months
Inactivated injectable:
From nonvaccinated mare:
First dose: 6 months; Second dose: 7 months; Third dose: 8 months; Then 3-month intervals. From vaccinated mare: First dose: 9 months; Second dose: 10 months; Third dose: 11 to 12 months; Then at 3-month intervals.
Intranasal modified live virus vaccine: First does: 11 months; has been safely administered to foals less than 11 months - see comments

Yearlings

Annual, spring
Inactivated injectable: Every 3 to 4 months
Intranasal: Every 6 months
Performance Horses Annual, spring
Inactivated injectable: Every 3 to 4 months
Intranasal: Every 6 months
Pleasure
Horses
Annual, spring

Inactivated injectable:
Annual with added boosters prior to likely exposure
Intranasal: Every 6 months

Broodmares Annual, 4 to 6 weeks before due date
Inactivated injectable:At least semiannual, with 1 booster 4 to 6 weeks prior to due date
Intranasal:
Annual before breeding (see comments)
Comments In endemic areas booster EEE and WEE every 6 months; VEE only needed when threat of exposure; VEE may only be available as a combination vaccine with EEE and WEE.

A series of at least 3 doses is recommended for primary immunization of foals. Not recommended for pregnant mare until data available. Use inactivated vaccine for pregnant mare booster. If first dose is administered to foals less than 11 months of age, administer 2nd dose at or after 11 months of age.




Disease
Rhinopneumonitis (Rhino) EHV-1 and EHV-4
Strangles
Foals and Weanlings First dose: 4 to 6 months; Second dose: 5 to 7 months; Third dose: 6 to 8 months; Then at 3-month intervals.
Injectable: First dose: 4 to 6 months; Second dose: 5 to 7 months; Third dose: 7 to 8 months (depending on product used); Fourth dose: 12 months.
Intranasal: First dose: 6 to 9 months; Second dose: 3 weeks later.
Yearlings
Booster every 3 to 4 months up to annually


Semi-annual

Performance Horses

Booster every 3 to 4 months up to annually

Optional: semi-annual if risk is high
Pleasure
Horses

Optional: semiannual if elected

Optional: semi-annual if risk is high

Broodmares



Fifth, seventh, ninth month of gestation (inactivated EHV-1 vaccine); optional dose at third month of gestation

Semi-annual with 1 dose of inactivated M-protein vaccine 4 to 6 weks before due date

Comments Vaccination of mares before breeding and 4 to 6 weeks before due date is suggested. Breeding stallions should be vaccinated before the breeding season and semiannually
Vaccines containing M-protein extract may be less reactive than whole-cell vaccines. Use when endemic conditions exist or risk is high.Foals as young as 6 weeks-of-age may safely receive the intranasal product. A third dose should be administered 2 to 4 weeks prior to weaning




Disease
Rabies
Potomac Horse Fever
Foals and Weanlings Non-vaccinated mares: First dose: 3 to 4 months; Second dose: 12 months.
Vaccinated mares: First dose: 6 months; Second dose: 7 months; Third dose: 12 months.

First dose: 5 to 6 months; Second dose: 6 to 7 months
Yearlings

Annual

Semi-annual

Performance Horses

Annual Semi-annual
Pleasure
Horses
Annual Semi-annual
Broodmares Annual, before breeding
Semi-annual with 1 dose 4 to 6 weeks before due date.
Comments Vaccination recommended in endemic areas. Do not use modified-live-virus vaccines in horses.
Booster during May to June in endemic areas.




Disease
Botulism
Equine Viral Arteritis (EVA)
Foals and Weanlings Foal from vaccinated mare: 3 dose series of toxoid at 30 day intervals starting at 2 to 3 months-of-age. Foal from non-vaccinated mare: see comments
Intact colts intended to be breeding stallions: One dose at 6 to 12 months-of-age.
Yearlings Consult your veterinarian
Annual for colts intended to be breeding stallions
Performance Horses Consult your veterinarian
Annual for colts intended to be breeding stallions
Pleasure
Horses
Consult your veterinarian
Annual for colts intended to be breeding stallions
Broodmares Initial 3 dose series at 30 day intervals with last dose 4 to 6 weeks prior to due date. Annually thereafter, 4 to 6 weeks prepartum
Annual for seronegative, open mares before breeding to carrier stalions; isolate mares for 21 days after breeding to carrier stallion
Comments Only in endemic areas. A third dose administered 4 to 6 weeks after the second dose may improve the response of foals to primary immunization. Foals from non-vaccinated mare may benefit from: 1)toxoid at 2, 4 and 8 weeks of age. 2) Transfusion of plasma from vaccinated horse; or 3) antitoxin. Efficacy needs further study. Annual for breeding stallions and teasers, 28 days before start of breeding season;virus may be shed in semen for up to 21 days. Vaccinated mares do not develop clinical signs even though they become transiently infected and may shed virus for a short time.




Disease
Rotavirus A
Foals and Weanlings Little value to vaccinate foal because insuffiecient time to develop antibodies to protect during susceptible age
Yearlings Not applicable
Performance Horses Not applicable
Pleasure
Horses
Not applicable
Broodmares Vaccinate mares at 8, 9 and 10 months of every pregnancy. Passive transfer of colstral antibodies iad in prevention of rotaviral diarrhea in foals.
Comments Check concentrations of immunoglobulins in foal to be assured that there is no failure of passive transfer.





Consult with veterinarian to set up vaccination program and before using any vaccines.
Read all label inserts before using vaccines.
EEE=Eastern Equine Encephalomyelitis, WEE=Western Equine Encephalomyelitis, VEE=Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis EHV-1=Equine Herpes Virus type


© Copyright Bayer AG 2003

The material presented herein is provided by HorseScapes.com for entertaiment, educational and informational purposes only. Decisions regarding the health and welfare of your horse should be made only after consultation with a veterinarian with whom a valid client-patient-veterinarian relationship has been established.


 
Related Links
· More about Horse Tips and Suggestions
· News by iljiana


Most read story about Horse Tips and Suggestions:
Cooking: Homemade Horse Treats



Article Rating
Average Score: 0
Votes: 0

Please take a second and vote for this article:

Excellent
Very Good
Good
Regular
Bad


Options

 Printer Friendly Printer Friendly



 
AlabamaAlaskaArizonaArkansasCaliforniaColorado ConnecticutDelawareFloridaGeorgiaHawaiiIdahoIllinois
IndiannaIowaKansasKentuckyLouisianaMaineMaryland MassachusettsMichiganMinnesotaMississippiMissouriMontana
NebraskaNevadaNew HampshireNew JerseyNew Mexico New YorkNorth CarolinaNorth DakotaOhioOklahoma
OregonPennsylvaniaRhode IslandSouth CarolinaSouth Dakota TennesseeTexasUtahVermontVirginiaWashington
Washington DCWest VirginiaWisconsinWyoming
CanadaUSAWorldwide


All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owner.
The comments are property of their posters, all the rest © 2005 - 2009 by HorseScapes.com
Site design and hosting by SSC Electronics.com

PHP-Nuke Copyright © 2004 by Francisco Burzi.
This is free software, and you may redistribute it under the GPL.
PHP-Nuke comes with absolutely no warranty, for details, see the license.